You MUST know your employees Disc pattern before
you implement any of the strategy in this section.

It's time for 
							your Annual Review.
This section is for the Elevanto masters and mistresses, ladies and gentlemen.

You will most likely need assistance if you are here by accident :-) This might tell you what but it will not tell you how. Contact us for an obligation free quote.

Here are all sixteen patterns - going through their performance appraisal or review.

They will be here and you must have already worked the interviewee's pattern.

Conducted and composed by Elizabeth Hunter™ - Last Update 30 January, 2020


1. Can it be the Director - ESTJ?

The Director is the Border Collie

General strategy for the High D Quadrant:

The High D can have a strong personality and who are driven by quick action. It is a very good bet they may walk into the meeting with a defensive mindset as they can be argumentative at times. The key for a successful performance review session is knowing they are always looking for opportunities to advance.
Step 1: Start by asking what they need from you, the boss, in order to be more successful.
Step 2: Listen then ask if you can share a couple of things you think will help them advance their career. Asking before telling helps them feel they are in charge of the performance review (High D's dislike outside rules) and you can give them your insights with little to no defensive behaviour.
Step 3: Be business like, no chit chat.

What the Director (a Guardian per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Director prefers to receive performance goals in a structured environment where feedback can be grouped and considered all in one place. So, a traditional end-of-year performance review will suit well. They need concrete performance metrics that are specifically tailored to their own work situation. They will resent waffle - vague suggestions about their growth areas – performance goals that leave too much to the imagination will be discounted or ignored completely.

What to put as the Director's type goals:

If you want them to use their initiative - "Devise a strategy for delegating work more effectively to free up three hours a week. Use this time to assume X and Y responsibilities beyond your current job description."

If you want them to be creative and solve problems - "Create a shortlist of options for the marketing business unit's new productivity software. Experiment with all the options and provide constructive feedback together with your recommendations."

If you want them to up the teamwork - "Serve on the corporate social responsibility committee this year. Build relationships among team members that foster collaboration and discussion of new ideas consistent with the business plan."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Director:

The Director can be a hardworking perfectionist. They are highly organized and place value on work over play. The Director can be your planner - they will not only work hard, they will do so very efficiently to implement agreed plans. Beware of group work. The Director sees groups as introducing risk into the workplace and many will avoid teamwork or cooperate only on their own terms and in limited doses. Teamwork aside, the Director will have a deep sense of loyalty to the organization and, if properly motivated, will provide dutiful and faithful service.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

Their my way or the highway attitude will be present.

-
 

2. Can it be the Developer - ENTJ?

The Developer is the German Shepherd

General strategy for the High D Quadrant:

The High D can have a strong personality and who are driven by quick action. It is a very good bet they may walk into the meeting with a defensive mindset as they can be argumentative at times. The key for a successful performance review session is knowing they are always looking for opportunities to advance.
Step 1: Start by asking what they need from you, the boss, in order to be more successful.
Step 2: Listen then ask if you can share a couple of things you think will help them advance their career. Asking before telling helps them feel they are in charge of the performance review (High D's dislike outside rules) and you can give them your insights with little to no defensive behaviour.
Step 3: Be business like, no chit chat.

What the Developer (a Rational per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Developer prefers to receive performance goals in a structured environment where feedback can be grouped and considered all in one place. So, a traditional end-of-year performance review will suit well. They need concrete performance metrics that are specifically tailored to their own work situation. They will resent waffle - vague suggestions about their growth areas – performance goals that leave too much to the imagination will be discounted or ignored completely.

What to put as the Developer's goals:

If you want them to use their expertise - "Find and connect with experts to further boost your skills in X area. Become the division's expert source in this subject."

If you want them to be collaborative facilitate the open sharing of information - "Serve as a mentor for [named junior staff members] and prepare a list of mentoring strategies ideas the division can apply with all employees."

If you want them to up the exploitation of conceptual thinking - "Develop a quality improvement process for the [named system] that reduces the failure rate to 1 percent by December."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Developer:

The Developer is both logical and innovative. They have a never-ending stream of ideas and will work hard in order to make them a reality. They show confidence in their work and seek out opportunities for mastery and specialization, often coming up with creative alternatives to organization-wide problems. Like the Guardians, the Developer is not a natural team player. They may come across as ruthless when asked to work in a team.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

Their competitive nature will come out - they reckon they should be your boss.

-
 

3. Can it be the Results - ESTP?

The Results is the Jack Russell Terrier

General strategy for the High D Quadrant:

The High D can have a strong personality and who are driven by quick action. It is a very good bet they may walk into the meeting with a defensive mindset as they can be argumentative at times. The key for a successful performance review session is knowing they are always looking for opportunities to advance.
Step 1: Start by asking what they need from you, the boss, in order to be more successful.
Step 2: Listen then ask if you can share a couple of things you think will help them advance their career. Asking before telling helps them feel they are in charge of the performance review (High D's dislike outside rules) and you can give them your insights with little to no defensive behaviour.
Step 3: Be business like, no chit chat.

What the Results (an Artisan per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

Results need lots of concrete feedback—preferably in real time—so they know when you are happy with them and their performance. While it is okay to set performance goals annually or biannually, you really should not leave it so long to keep your Results motivated and on-track; regular check ins are essential. The Results can be sensitive, so emphasise their strengths when recommending areas for improvement.

What to put as the Results goals:

If you want them to be punctual - "Be on time for all meetings. The team values your creativity and enthusiasm and it shows that you respect your colleagues' time."

If you want them to focus on task completion - "Establish a process for tracking progress on key projects including milestones and decision deadlines. Share with the manager by February 10. Provide weekly update reports."

If you want them to up foster leadership - "I think you have great leadership potential. You are quick on your feet and are able to motivate the team. Find and enroll in one leadership development course or seminar by July. Apply the skills you learn to discover the problems that prevent team members from performing at the highest possible levels. Feedback to management by September 30."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Results:

The Results is one of the people-people of your workplace. They are energetic and spontaneous, full of enthusiasm and like to voice an opinion. The Results is typically creative in a practical, hands-on type of way and can always be counted on to troubleshoot problems. They often prioritize having fun in the workplace and are typically less punctual, organized and structured than other team-members.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

Bring your bullet proof vest as they will seek to intimidate.

-
 

4. Can it be the Inspirational - ENTP?

The Inspirational is the Bull Terrier

General strategy for the High D Quadrant:

The High D can have a strong personality and who are driven by quick action. It is a very good bet they may walk into the meeting with a defensive mindset as they can be argumentative at times. The key for a successful performance review session is knowing they are always looking for opportunities to advance.
Step 1: Start by asking what they need from you, the boss, in order to be more successful.
Step 2: Listen then ask if you can share a couple of things you think will help them advance their career. Asking before telling helps them feel they are in charge of the performance review (High D's dislike outside rules) and you can give them your insights with little to no defensive behaviour.
Step 3: Be business like, no chit chat.

What the Inspirational (a Rational per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Inspirational prefers to receive performance goals in a structured environment where feedback can be grouped and considered all in one place. So, a traditional end-of-year performance review will suit well. They need concrete performance metrics that are specifically tailored to their own work situation. They will resent waffle - vague suggestions about their growth areas – performance goals that leave too much to the imagination will be discounted or ignored completely.

What to put as the Inspirational's goals:

If you want them to use their expertise - "Find and connect with experts to further boost your skills in X area. Become the division's expert source in this subject."

If you want them to be collaborative facilitate the open sharing of information - "Serve as a mentor for [named junior staff members] and prepare a list of mentoring strategies ideas the division can apply with all employees."

If you want them to up the exploitation of conceptual thinking - "Develop a quality improvement process for the [named system] that reduces the failure rate to 1 percent by December."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Inspirational:

The Inspirational is both logical and innovative. They have a never-ending stream of ideas and will work hard in order to make them a reality. They show confidence in their work and seek out opportunities for mastery and specialization, often coming up with creative alternatives to organization-wide problems. Like the Guardians, the Inspirational is not a natural team player. They may come across as argumentative when asked to work in a team.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

There will be a debate on something - mark my words.

-
 

5. Can it be the Persuader - ENFJ?

The Persuader is the Boxer

General strategy for the High I Quadrant:

The High I's greatest fear is rejection, so they will approach the performance review with dread. No matter how much good you say about them, any 'constructive' feedback will be seen as total rejection and a dint in their ego. Although not necessarily your style, start off by gushing about their achievements, contributions and energy. Be genuine. After you ask what they need to be successful (and listen to their answers), ask if they want to change anything about how they perform. They will answer. Listen, affirm and ask how you can help with that change. Unless there is a severe performance issue (which should not have waited until the annual review, but may well have), simply shake their hand, thank them for their hard work and go to lunch. You will have problems with underperforming High I's and when confrontation is involved.

What the Persuader (an Idealist per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Persuader tend to be open, receptive and motivated to improve themselves. In theory, they should be easy to appraise and performance/ growth goals should be well received. They do, however, place great value on maintaining harmony so take care to give constructive feedback in a non-judgmental manner. It is helpful if the Persuader receives performance reviews from someone they have a good relationship with.

What to put as the Persuader's goals:

If you want them to encourage tolerance for debate and conflict - "Facilitate the team meetings this year and help get to the root of our conflicts. As part of this goal, you should take responsibility for managing poor behavior in meetings, including disciplining employees who do not perform to standard, to enhance communications and performance."

If you want them to boost practicality over idealism - "Translate the team's key vision of improving customer service into a specific action plan for raising customer satisfaction scores to over 90 percent and reducing by 20 percent the average problem resolution time."

If you want them to boost decisionmaking - "Prepare a cost-benefit analysis to determine the feasibility of hiring a temporary contractor to support the team during XYZ project. Present your decision to management by January 10."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Persuader:

The Persuader is an open-minded peace keeper of your organization. They value relationships and cooperation and are the last to be involved in confrontation or conflict. They have a preference for ideals over practicalities and often struggle to make the tough decisions out of fear of upsetting someone. While they can be private and hard to read, the Persuader tends to bring a calm and friendly presence to the workplace. The Idealist group pattern like to feel that they are being supported and work hard to make others feel supported in return. They are appreciated by many for this quality.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

They like to interfere ahead of being accountable. They will squirm.

-
 

6. Can it be the Appraiser - ESFJ

The Appraiser is the Great Dane

General strategy for the High I Quadrant:

The High I's greatest fear is rejection, so they will approach the performance review with dread. No matter how much good you say about them, any 'constructive' feedback will be seen as total rejection and a dint in their ego. Although not necessarily your style, start off by gushing about their achievements, contributions and energy. Be genuine. After you ask what they need to be successful (and listen to their answers), ask if they want to change anything about how they perform. They will answer. Listen, affirm and ask how you can help with that change. Unless there is a severe performance issue (which should not have waited until the annual review, but may well have), simply shake their hand, thank them for their hard work and go to lunch. You will have problems with underperforming High I's and when confrontation is involved.

What the Appraiser (a Guardian per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Appraiser prefers to receive performance goals in a structured environment where feedback can be grouped and considered all in one place. So, a traditional end-of-year performance review will suit well. They need concrete performance metrics that are specifically tailored to their own work situation. They will resent waffle - vague suggestions about their growth areas – performance goals that leave too much to the imagination will be discounted or ignored completely.

What to put as the Appraiser's type goals:

If you want them to use their initiative - "Devise a strategy for delegating work more effectively to free up three hours a week. Use this time to assume X and Y responsibilities beyond your current job description."

If you want them to be creative and solve problems - "Create a shortlist of options for the marketing business unit's new productivity software. Experiment with all the options and provide constructive feedback together with your recommendations."

If you want them to up the teamwork - "Serve on the corporate social responsibility committee this year. Build relationships among team members that foster collaboration and discussion of new ideas consistent with the business plan."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Appraiser:

The Appraiser can be a hardworking perfectionist. They are highly organized and place value on work over play. The Appraiser can be your planner - they will not only work hard, they will do so very efficiently to implement agreed plans. Beware of group work. The Appraiser sees groups as introducing disruption into the workplace and many will avoid teamwork or cooperate only on their own terms and in limited doses. Teamwork aside, the Appraiser will have a deep sense of loyalty to the organization and, if properly motivated, will provide dutiful and faithful service.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

They are obedient and will be okay in a review.

-
 

7. Can it be the Promoter - ENFP?

The Promoter is the Golden Retriever

General strategy for the High I Quadrant:

The High I's greatest fear is rejection, so they will approach the performance review with dread. No matter how much good you say about them, any 'constructive' feedback will be seen as total rejection and a dint in their ego. Although not necessarily your style, start off by gushing about their achievements, contributions and energy. Be genuine. After you ask what they need to be successful (and listen to their answers), ask if they want to change anything about how they perform. They will answer. Listen, affirm and ask how you can help with that change. Unless there is a severe performance issue (which should not have waited until the annual review, but may well have), simply shake their hand, thank them for their hard work and go to lunch. You will have problems with underperforming High I's and when confrontation is involved.

What the Promoter (an Idealist per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Promoter tends to be open, receptive and motivated to improve themselves. In theory, they should be easy to appraise and performance/ growth goals should be well received. They do, however, place great value on maintaining harmony so take care to give constructive feedback in a non-judgmental manner. It is helpful if the Promoter receives performance reviews from someone they have a good relationship with.

What to put as the Promoter's goals:

If you want them to encourage tolerance for debate and conflict - "Facilitate the team meetings this year and help get to the root of our conflicts. As part of this goal, you should take responsibility for managing poor behavior in meetings, including disciplining employees who do not perform to standard, to enhance communications and performance."

If you want them to boost practicality over idealism - "Translate the team's key vision of improving customer service into a specific action plan for raising customer satisfaction scores to over 90 percent and reducing by 20 percent the average problem resolution time."

If you want them to boost decisionmaking - "Prepare a cost-benefit analysis to determine the feasibility of hiring a temporary contractor to support the team during XYZ project. Present your decision to management by January 10."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Promoter:

The Promoter is an open-minded peace keeper of your organization. They value relationships and cooperation and are the last to be involved in confrontation or conflict. They have a preference for ideals over practicalities and often struggle to make the tough decisions out of fear of upsetting someone. While they can be private and hard to read, the Promoter tends to bring a calm and friendly presence to the workplace. The Idealist group pattern like to feel that they are being supported and work hard to make others feel supported in return. They are appreciated by many for this quality.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

This is a very difficult employee to deal with as they have micro attention span, a cavalcade of excuses and are woeful finishers.

-
 

8. Can it be the Counselor - ESFP

The Counselor is the Poodle

General strategy for the High I Quadrant:

The High I's greatest fear is rejection, so they will approach the performance review with dread. No matter how much good you say about them, any 'constructive' feedback will be seen as total rejection and a dint in their ego. Although not necessarily your style, start off by gushing about their achievements, contributions and energy. Be genuine. After you ask what they need to be successful (and listen to their answers), ask if they want to change anything about how they perform. They will answer. Listen, affirm and ask how you can help with that change. Unless there is a severe performance issue (which should not have waited until the annual review, but may well have), simply shake their hand, thank them for their hard work and go to lunch. You will have problems with underperforming High I's and when confrontation is involved.

What the Counselor (an Artisan per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Counselor need lots of concrete feedback—preferably in real time—so they know when you are happy with them and their performance. While it is okay to set performance goals annually or biannually, you really should not leave it so long to keep your Counselor motivated and on-track; regular check ins are essential. The Counselor can be sensitive, so emphasise their strengths when recommending areas for improvement.

What to put as the Counselor's goals:

If you want them to be punctual - "Be on time for all meetings. The team values your creativity and enthusiasm and it shows that you respect your colleagues' time."

If you want them to focus on task completion - "Establish a process for tracking progress on key projects including milestones and decision deadlines. Share with the manager by February 10. Provide weekly update reports."

If you want them to up foster leadership - "I think you have great leadership potential. You are quick on your feet and are able to motivate the team. Find and enroll in one leadership development course or seminar by July. Apply the skills you learn to discover the problems that prevent team members from performing at the highest possible levels. Feedback to management by September 30."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Counselor:

The Counselor is one of the people-people of your workplace. They are energetic and spontaneous, full of enthusiasm and like to voice an opinion. The Counselor is typically creative in a practical, hands-on type of way and can always be counted on to troubleshoot problems. They often prioritize having fun in the workplace and are typically less punctual, organized and structured than other team-members.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

This one favours the party animal style over accountability so you will have issues.

-
 

9. Can it be the Specialist - ISFP

The Specialist is the Saint Bernard

General strategy for the High S Quadrant:

The High S's greatest fear is that the performance review is an opportunity a time to make changes. This sounds like a great idea but the High S fear change, particularly unexpected and sudden change. Everything was going along just fine, thank you very much, and the High S wants it to stay that way. Similar to the High I they avoid confrontation. The difference is that the High S likes routine, so find a way to talk about the growth opportunities as if they were building new routines. If you get them focussed on the safety of new 'routines', including phasing them in, they will look past the fear of change and stretch themselves.

What the Specialist (an Artisan per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Specialist need lots of concrete feedback—preferably in real time—so they know when you are happy with them and their performance. While it is okay to set performance goals annually or biannually, you really should not leave it so long to keep your Specialist motivated and on-track; regular check ins are essential. The Specialist can be sensitive, so emphasise their strengths when recommending areas for improvement.

What to put as the Specialist's goals:

If you want them to be punctual - "Be on time for all meetings. The team values your creativity and enthusiasm and it shows that you respect your colleagues' time."

If you want them to focus on task completion - "Establish a process for tracking progress on key projects including milestones and decision deadlines. Share with the manager by February 10. Provide weekly update reports."

If you want them to up foster leadership - "I think you have great leadership potential. You are quick on your feet and are able to motivate the team. Find and enroll in one leadership development course or seminar by July. Apply the skills you learn to discover the problems that prevent team members from performing at the highest possible levels. Feedback to management by September 30."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Counselor:

The Counselor is one of the people-people of your workplace. They are energetic and spontaneous, full of enthusiasm and like to voice an opinion. The Counselor is typically creative in a practical, hands-on type of way and can always be counted on to troubleshoot problems. They often prioritize having fun in the workplace and are typically less punctual, organized and structured than other team-members.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

If you are introducing change, give this time as they hate change.

-
 

10. Can it be the Investigator - INFJ?

The Investigator is the Greyhound

General strategy for the High S Quadrant:

The High S's greatest fear is that the performance review is an opportunity a time to make changes. This sounds like a great idea but the High S fear change, particularly unexpected and sudden change. Everything was going along just fine, thank you very much, and the High S wants it to stay that way. Similar to the High I they avoid confrontation. The difference is that the High S likes routine, so find a way to talk about the growth opportunities as if they were building new routines. If you get them focussed on the safety of new 'routines', including phasing them in, they will look past the fear of change and stretch themselves.

What the Investigator (an Idealist per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Investigator tend to be open, receptive and motivated to improve themselves. In theory, they should be easy to appraise and performance/ growth goals should be well received. They do, however, place great value on maintaining harmony so take care to give constructive feedback in a non-judgmental manner. It is helpful if the Investigator receives performance reviews from someone they have a good relationship with.

What to put as the Investigator's goals:

If you want them to encourage tolerance for debate and conflict - "Facilitate the team meetings this year and help get to the root of our conflicts. As part of this goal, you should take responsibility for managing poor behavior in meetings, including disciplining employees who do not perform to standard, to enhance communications and performance."

If you want them to boost practicality over idealism - "Translate the team's key vision of improving customer service into a specific action plan for raising customer satisfaction scores to over 90 percent and reducing by 20 percent the average problem resolution time."

If you want them to boost decisionmaking - "Prepare a cost-benefit analysis to determine the feasibility of hiring a temporary contractor to support the team during XYZ project. Present your decision to management by January 10."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Investigator:

The Investigator is an open-minded peace keeper of your organization. They value relationships and cooperation and are the last to be involved in confrontation or conflict. They have a preference for ideals over practicalities and often struggle to make the tough decisions out of fear of upsetting someone. While they can be private and hard to read, the Investigator tends to bring a calm and friendly presence to the workplace. The Idealist group pattern like to feel that they are being supported and work hard to make others feel supported in return. They are appreciated by many for this quality.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

This pattern can be two faced and confuse beliefs with facts.

-
 

11. Can it be the Agent - INFP?

The Agent is the Tibetan Terrier

General strategy for the High S Quadrant:

The High S's greatest fear is that the performance review is an opportunity a time to make changes. This sounds like a great idea but the High S fear change, particularly unexpected and sudden change. Everything was going along just fine, thank you very much, and the High S wants it to stay that way. Similar to the High I they avoid confrontation. The difference is that the High S likes routine, so find a way to talk about the growth opportunities as if they were building new routines. If you get them focussed on the safety of new 'routines', including phasing them in, they will look past the fear of change and stretch themselves.

What the Agent (an Idealist per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Agent tends to be open, receptive and motivated to improve themselves. In theory, they should be easy to appraise and performance/ growth goals should be well received. They do, however, place great value on maintaining harmony so take care to give constructive feedback in a non-judgmental manner. It is helpful if the Agent receives performance reviews from someone they have a good relationship with.

What to put as the Agent's goals:

If you want them to encourage tolerance for debate and conflict - "Facilitate the team meetings this year and help get to the root of our conflicts. As part of this goal, you should take responsibility for managing poor behavior in meetings, including disciplining employees who do not perform to standard, to enhance communications and performance."

If you want them to boost practicality over idealism - "Translate the team's key vision of improving customer service into a specific action plan for raising customer satisfaction scores to over 90 percent and reducing by 20 percent the average problem resolution time."

If you want them to boost decisionmaking - "Prepare a cost-benefit analysis to determine the feasibility of hiring a temporary contractor to support the team during XYZ project. Present your decision to management by January 10."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Agent:

The Agent is an open-minded peace keeper of your organization. They value relationships and cooperation and are the last to be involved in confrontation or conflict. They have a preference for ideals over practicalities and often struggle to make the tough decisions out of fear of upsetting someone. While they can be private and hard to read, the Agent tends to bring a calm and friendly presence to the workplace. The Idealist group pattern like to feel that they are being supported and work hard to make others feel supported in return. They are appreciated by many for this quality.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

This is a very difficult employee to deal with as they distort reality with fantasy and can pose trouble to others.

-
 

12. Can it be the Achiever - ISTP?

The Achiever is the Bassett Hound

General strategy for the High S Quadrant:

The High S's greatest fear is that the performance review is an opportunity a time to make changes. This sounds like a great idea but the High S fear change, particularly unexpected and sudden change. Everything was going along just fine, thank you very much, and the High S wants it to stay that way. Similar to the High I they avoid confrontation. The difference is that the High S likes routine, so find a way to talk about the growth opportunities as if they were building new routines. If you get them focussed on the safety of new 'routines', including phasing them in, they will look past the fear of change and stretch themselves.

What the Achiever (an Artisan per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Achiever need lots of concrete feedback—preferably in real time—so they know when you are happy with them and their performance. While it is okay to set performance goals annually or biannually, you really should not leave it so long to keep your Achiever motivated and on-track; regular check ins are essential. The Achiever can be sensitive, so emphasise their strengths when recommending areas for improvement.

What to put as the the Achiever's goals:

If you want them to be punctual - "Be on time for all meetings. The team values your creativity and enthusiasm and it shows that you respect your colleagues' time."

If you want them to focus on task completion - "Establish a process for tracking progress on key projects including milestones and decision deadlines. Share with the manager by February 10. Provide weekly update reports."

If you want them to up foster leadership - "I think you have great leadership potential. You are quick on your feet and are able to motivate the team. Find and enroll in one leadership development course or seminar by July. Apply the skills you learn to discover the problems that prevent team members from performing at the highest possible levels. Feedback to management by September 30."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Achiever:

The Achiever is one of the people-people of your workplace. They are energetic and spontaneous, full of enthusiasm and like to voice an opinion. The the Achiever is typically creative in a practical, hands-on type of way and can always be counted on to troubleshoot problems. They often prioritize having fun in the workplace and are typically less punctual, organized and structured than other team-members.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

Beware if you have this person in a position to delegate as they tend to take back the work.

-
 

13. Can it be the Practitioner - ISFJ?

The Practitioner is the Alaskan Malamute

General strategy for the High C Quadrant:

The High C's greatest fear is that the performance review is an opportunity for the boss to dish out the criticism. They also love details. When you provide them with their contributions, be sure to have a good amount of detail. Realise they will come prepared with data to disprove any performance suggestion you have for them. So do not have any. Once you ask about what they would like to improve in their job performance, they will list more than enough growth opportunities. At that point, your job will be to help narrow their focus to one to two performance improvements.

What the Practitioner (a Guardian per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Practitioner prefers to receive performance goals in a structured environment where feedback can be grouped and considered all in one place. So, a traditional end-of-year performance review will suit well. They need concrete performance metrics that are specifically tailored to their own work situation. They will resent waffle - vague suggestions about their growth areas – performance goals that leave too much to the imagination will be discounted or ignored completely.

What to put as the Practitioner's type goals:

If you want them to use their initiative - "Devise a strategy for delegating work more effectively to free up three hours a week. Use this time to assume X and Y responsibilities beyond your current job description."

If you want them to be creative and solve problems - "Create a shortlist of options for the marketing business unit's new productivity software. Experiment with all the options and provide constructive feedback together with your recommendations."

If you want them to up the teamwork - "Serve on the corporate social responsibility committee this year. Build relationships among team members that foster collaboration and discussion of new ideas consistent with the business plan."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Practitioner:

The Practitioner can be a hardworking perfectionist. They are highly organized and place value on work over play. The Practitioner can be your planner - they will not only work hard, they will do so very efficiently to implement agreed plans. Beware of group work. The Practitioner sees groups as introducing disruption into the workplace and many will avoid teamwork or cooperate only on their own terms and in limited doses. Teamwork aside, the Practitioner will have a deep sense of loyalty to the organization and, if properly motivated, will provide dutiful and faithful service.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

You will find that they prefer to sweep problems under the carpet to avoid conflict. They are the victim and are passive-aggressive, especially when held to account.

-
 

14. Can it be the Objective Thinker - ISTJ?

The Objective Thinker is the Bernese Mountain Dog

General strategy for the High C Quadrant:

The High C's greatest fear is that the performance review is an opportunity for the boss to dish out the criticism. They also love details. When you provide them with their contributions, be sure to have a good amount of detail. Realise they will come prepared with data to disprove any performance suggestion you have for them. So do not have any. Once you ask about what they would like to improve in their job performance, they will list more than enough growth opportunities. At that point, your job will be to help narrow their focus to one to two performance improvements.

What the OT (a Guardian per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The OT prefers to receive performance goals in a structured environment where feedback can be grouped and considered all in one place. So, a traditional end-of-year performance review will suit well. They need concrete performance metrics that are specifically tailored to their own work situation. They will resent waffle - vague suggestions about their growth areas – performance goals that leave too much to the imagination will be discounted or ignored completely.

What to put as the OT's type goals:

If you want them to use their initiative - "Devise a strategy for delegating work more effectively to free up three hours a week. Use this time to assume X and Y responsibilities beyond your current job description."

If you want them to be creative and solve problems - "Create a shortlist of options for the marketing business unit's new productivity software. Experiment with all the options and provide constructive feedback together with your recommendations."

If you want them to up the teamwork - "Serve on the corporate social responsibility committee this year. Build relationships among team members that foster collaboration and discussion of new ideas consistent with the business plan."

Specific strategy when reviewing the OT:

The OT can be a hardworking perfectionist. They are highly organized and place value on work over play. The OT can be your planner - they will not only work hard, they will do so very efficiently to implement agreed plans. Beware of group work. The OT sees groups as introducing bias into the workplace and many will avoid teamwork or cooperate only on their own terms and in limited doses. Teamwork aside, the Ot will have a deep sense of loyalty to the organization and, if properly motivated, will provide dutiful and faithful service.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

You must have facts to back everything you say, lest the review become lopsided.

-
 

15. Can it be the Perfectionist - INTP?

The Perfectionist is the Papillon

General strategy for the High C Quadrant:

The High C's greatest fear is that the performance review is an opportunity for the boss to dish out the criticism. They also love details. When you provide them with their contributions, be sure to have a good amount of detail. Realise they will come prepared with data to disprove any performance suggestion you have for them. So do not have any. Once you ask about what they would like to improve in their job performance, they will list more than enough growth opportunities. At that point, your job will be to help narrow their focus to one to two performance improvements.

What the Perfectionist (a Rational per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Perfectionist prefers to receive performance goals in a structured environment where feedback can be grouped and considered all in one place. So, a traditional end-of-year performance review will suit well. They need concrete performance metrics that are specifically tailored to their own work situation. They will resent waffle - vague suggestions about their growth areas – performance goals that leave too much to the imagination will be discounted or ignored completely.

What to put as the Perfectionist's goals:

If you want them to use their expertise - "Find and connect with experts to further boost your skills in X area. Become the division's expert source in this subject."

If you want them to be collaborative facilitate the open sharing of information - "Serve as a mentor for [named junior staff members] and prepare a list of mentoring strategies ideas the division can apply with all employees."

If you want them to up the exploitation of conceptual thinking - "Develop a quality improvement process for the [named system] that reduces the failure rate to 1 percent by December."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Perfectionist:

The Perfectionist is both logical and innovative. They have a never-ending stream of ideas and will work hard in order to make them a reality. They show confidence in their work and seek out opportunities for mastery and specialization, often coming up with creative alternatives to organization-wide problems. Like the Guardians, the Perfectionist is not a natural team player. They may come across as detached when asked to work in a team.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

They detest group work and need more time to finish anything. Ranked as the smartest, you should not let them baffle you with science.

-
 

16. Can it be the Enhancer - INTJ?

The Enhancer is the Afghan Hound

General strategy for the High C Quadrant:

The High C's greatest fear is that the performance review is an opportunity for the boss to dish out the criticism. They also love details. When you provide them with their contributions, be sure to have a good amount of detail. Realise they will come prepared with data to disprove any performance suggestion you have for them. So do not have any. Once you ask about what they would like to improve in their job performance, they will list more than enough growth opportunities. At that point, your job will be to help narrow their focus to one to two performance improvements.

What the Enhancer (a Rational per Kiersey) is expecting from your review:

The Enhancer prefers to receive performance goals in a structured environment where feedback can be grouped and considered all in one place. So, a traditional end-of-year performance review will suit well. They need concrete performance metrics that are specifically tailored to their own work situation. They will resent waffle - vague suggestions about their growth areas – performance goals that leave too much to the imagination will be discounted or ignored completely.

What to put as the Enhancer's goals:

If you want them to use their expertise - "Find and connect with experts to further boost your skills in X area. Become the division's expert source in this subject."

If you want them to be collaborative facilitate the open sharing of information - "Serve as a mentor for [named junior staff members] and prepare a list of mentoring strategies ideas the division can apply with all employees."

If you want them to up the exploitation of conceptual thinking - "Develop a quality improvement process for the [named system] that reduces the failure rate to 1 percent by December."

Specific strategy when reviewing the Enhancer:

The Enhancer is both logical and innovative. They have a never-ending stream of ideas and will work hard in order to make them a reality. They show confidence in their work and seek out opportunities for mastery and specialization, often coming up with creative alternatives to organization-wide problems. Like the Guardians, the Enhancer is not a natural team player. They may come across as arrogant when asked to work in a team.

E. Hunter™ remarks, based on life experience:

As an Enhancer myself, you should get them off the teams and put them in charge of the teams. Bring proof to back anything you say. In one review, I was told by the Inspirational reviewer: "You are seen by others to be aloof and elitist". While that is true, as per this site, I asked for names and a debate ensued for weeks as I refused to sign my review. The issue was escalated to the General Manager. I ended up by writing in the review: "This comment cannot be substantiated and is therefore null and void." A permanent cold war ensued between the Enhancer and the Inspirational that lasted 5 years until the company left me.

-